Polyphonia 14: Morago: Magnificat Primi Toni

polyphonia-014This is the edition number 14 of the “Polyphonia” series, featuring Portuguese sacred vocal polyphony from the 16th and 17th centuries, edited by MPMP – Movimento Patrimonial pela Música Portuguesa. This number is the fith number devoted to the music of Estêvão Lopes Morago (c.1575-c.1630), composer of Spanish birth who spent all his life in Portugal, studided at the claustra of Évora Cathedral and was mestre de capela at Viseu Cathedral. (mais…)

Polyphonia 10: Diogo Dias Melgaz: Motets (2)

polyphonia010aThis is the second number of the Polyphonia series, edited by Movimento Patrimonial pela Música Portuguesa, comprising three more motets by Portuguese composer Diogo Dias Melgaz (1638-1700). Melgaz was mestre de capela at Évora Cathedral in the last decades of the 17th century. This edition comprises the motets Memento homo, Ille homo qui dicitur Jesus and In jejunio et fletu, all for four voices (SATB). (mais…)

Polyphonia 7: Diogo Dias Melgaz: Motets

polyphonia007aThis is the first number of the Polyphonia series, edited by Movimento Patrimonial pela Música Portuguesa, comprising three motets by Portuguese composer Diogo Dias Melgaz (1638-1700). Melgaz was mestre de capela at Évora Cathedral in the last decades of the 17th century. All his musical output survives in 18th-century sources, divided between the archives of the Patriarcal in Lisbon and Évora Cathedral. Like in Morago, I devoted a lot of attention to Melgaz’s music since (like Morago’s) there no easy access to editions of his music. This edition comprises the motets Honora patrem et matrem, Qui autem biberit ex aqua and Ego sum resurrectio, all for four voices (SATB). (mais…)

Polyphonia 11: Matheo d’Aranda

polyphonia 011The edition I prepared of Mateus d’Aranda surviving polyphonic works is finally available through the Movimento Patrimonial pela Música Portuguesa. This edition comprised the two known works (besides the two treatises) by the Spanish composer Mateus d’Aranda (c.1495-1548), an influent figure in Portuguese music of the first half of the 16th century. The two surviving works presented here are both for four voices (SATB): an Adjuva nos Deus and two fragments of a Credo. To be noted that the second fragment of this Credo still uses the pre-tridentine text setting “Et vitam futuri saeculi” (instead of the post-tridentine and actual “Et vitam venturi saeculi”). (mais…)

Polyphonia 6: Morago: Christmas Responsories

Last year I edited one of the few Christmas responsories sets by composers active in Portugal during the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries, in this case, the Spanish-born composer Estêvão Lopes Morago.

These are the eight responsories for four voices, with the versicles of several of them for three voices (usually SAT). These lively works, in which we can include the Advent motets for four (polyphonia 20 – in preparation) and five (polyphonia 5) voices, contrast with the more heavy emotions of the Lent and Holy Week works. Quite joyful are the Hodie nobis caelorum, Quem vidistis Pastores? and the Verbum caro. (mais…)

Giovanni P. da Palestrina’s ‘Ave Maria’ a 8

Digital edition of Giovanni Pierluigi da Palestrina’s setting of Ave Maria. This work is set for two choirs SATB. The Ave Maria a 8 is extant in one of the various Vatican (I-Rvat) manuscripts containing music by Palestrina. I must say that, in some occasions, I have the feeling that this work is not only by Palestrina but has later additions, like the example of the Stabat Mater a 8, which has further additions by Felice Anerio. Despite any misattributions this is still a fantastic work. This is edition is transposed a tone downwards and original note values were kept. (mais…)

Diogo D. Melgás’s ‘Salve Regina’

The digital edition of Portuguese composer Diogo Dias Melgás’s (1638-1700) motet Salve Regina. The text is taken from the hymn to the Virgin Mary. Original pitch and original note values were kept in this edition.

This work was recorded by Pro Cantione Antiqua in their cd Music of the Portuguese Renaissance and, more recently, by The Sixteen in their cd A Golden Age of Portuguese Music. (mais…)