Sebastián de Vivanco • O Rex gloriae

polifonia1aSebastián de Vivanco’s (1551-1622) double-choir motet O Rex gloriae. This work comes from his 1610 book of motets, printed in Salamanca. Here it is performed by Capilla Flamenca, dir. Dirk Snellings, and Oltremontano with their sackbutts and cornetts – a great recording, as is the rest of the CD that features many works from this book.

(mais…)

Francisco Martins • O vos omnes

Responsory for four voices, by Portuguese composer Francisco Martins (1628-1680). This is the fifth responsory at Matins for Holy Saturday, of the sets composed by Martins for Maundy Thursday, Good Friday and Holy Saturday respectively. Martins studied at Évora Cathedral and was mestre de capela at Elvas Cathedral. This is one of the recordings this group made at Angra Cathedral in early August 2013. (mais…)

Estêvão Lopes Morago • Sepulto Domino

The Motet Sepulto Domino, for four voices, by Estêvão Lopes Morago (c.1575-c.1630) is one of three small works for Holy Week that are present in the P-Va Ms 3. This work uses part of the text of the last responsory at matins for Holy Saturday.

This video was recorded during Ensemble da Sé de Angra‘s concert at the Igreja Matriz de Santa Cruz (city of Praia da Vitória), 3 February 2013. (mais…)

Coro da Sé de Angra, April 18-20

Sé de Angra (10)I’ll be singing with the choir of Angra Cathedral during this year’s Holy Week ceremonies. This year we will not be doing 17th-century sacred polyphony (I sung and directed the choir two years ago), but Portuguese liturgical music, which will be directed by the choir master Jorge Barbosa. Some of the antiphons were written especially for this occasion by my good friend and mestre de capela of the Cathedral Duarte Gonçalves da Rosa.

Diogo Dias Melgaz • Memento homo

Listening2Memento homo is, in my opinion, probably one of Diogo Dias Melgaz’s most impressive works. This “miniature” motet for four voices (SATB) survives in two 18th-century choir books housed at the Patriarchal archives in Lisbon and at Évora Cathedral. It is quite impressive how Melgaz emphasises the text’s message Memento homo, quia pulvis in pulverem reverteris (Remember, man, that dust thou art, and unto dust thou shalt return) using dotted rhythms and short musical figures. (mais…)